The Left Handed DNA
Hall of Fame


- Tom Schneider
The Left handed DNA Hall of Fame has moved.
Please note the NEW LOCATION:
http://www.fred.net/tds/leftdna/

http://www.fred.net/tds/LeftHanded.DNA.html

    1999

    version = 2.00 of leftyear1999.txt 2009 Sep 29


    1999

    Our Story So Far: The story line, if you have not had time to follow the previous 150 or so entries (!) is my slow realization that earth is being invaded by left handed DNA people ...

  1. Invitrogen web page background as of 1999 Jan 9. The company specializes in left handed DNA products.
  2. Altheatech advertisement in BioTechniques Vol. 26, No. 1, January 1999. They have purified left handed DNA from a purple and orange snake. This appears to be a native of the CT planet! Jane Maxwell, Vice President, Sales and Marketing, indicates that they discovered this error after they it had gone to print. This image is posted with permission.

  3. Time January 11, 1999, page 49. Genetic footprinting of left handed DNA was reportedly done by Alec Jeffreys in 1984! (Thanks to Antonio Regalado, regalado@mit.edu, Associate Editor Technology Review Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Bldg. W59-200, 201 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 for sending me the image.)

  4. The January 1999 Volume 14 Number 1 cover of the journal Spectroscopy indicates that spectroscopic studies are now being performed on left handed DNA. Other than polarization effects, I would expect this to be the same as right handed DNA, but the article doesn't seem to mention it. (Art direction by Sandy Kupsch, image number 59175 from PhotoDisc, Inc. Use their search engine with the word "DNA" to find their inverted DNA image.) The error was acknowledged by Mike MacRae, the Spectroscopy editor and Jennifer Yerkes of PhotoDisc. (Thanks to David G. Rhodes, University of Connecticut for finding sending me the journal issue!)
  5. TIBS 23 December 1998 page 493 cartoon by Simon '98, shows Sherlock looking at a left handed DNA with a magnification glass. He says "Excellent try, my dear Watson, but ... could you bring me a mirror, old boy?" Are people are beginning to realize that there has been a CT invasion? This image is posted with permission.
    (Click on image for a larger version.) Thanks to Jamie Simon (jamie_simon@qm.salk.edu) for drawing this cartoon and for permission to put it on the web.)
  6. The National Library of Medicine's impressive collection of original significant scientific papers Profiles in Science shows that not only did Avery discover DNA but he also had spectacular insight into the existence of left handed DNA.
    This image is posted with permission.
    as of 1999 January 28. They acknowledged the error and said: "However, as luck would have it, it was replaced yesterday with a different image which does not contain DNA."
  7. The UCSF Digital Library has a banner that may be left handed DNA. (Thanks to Paul Hengen (pnh@sirius.com) for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 January 28
  8. Lawrence Livemore National Laboratory's Biology and Biotechnology Research Program also has a banner that is definitely left handed DNA. (Thanks to Andy Hockey (a.hockey@ucl.ac.uk) for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 January 28. The web site was revised and the original image is not on the main page, but it still is at http://www-bio.llnl.gov/bbrp/gif/dna48.gif (Thanks to Keith Ball, kdb@maxwell.ucsf.edu, http://rainbow.uchicago.edu/~kdb1 for pointing this out!)
  9. Access Excellence (the excellent educational program of Genentech) has discovered a relationship between left and right handed DNA! Apparently under certain conditions (patent pending?) right handed DNA can replicate to produce both forms. (Thanks to Stan Metzenberg (smetz@gte.net) for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 January 30. (2000 December 31: Notice the mismatch between the newly opened strands; this mysertious replication mechanism has not been determined.)
  10. SIMPOSIUM INTERNACIONAL DE BIOTECNOLOGÍA APLICADA Y BIOÉTICA 24, 25 y 26 de marzo de 1999. This appears to be a symposium on the biotechnology of left handed DNA. as of 1999 February 24
  11. This case was corrected and removed by request.
  12. The cover of Oncogene Research Products' 1999 General Catalog "Tools for Biological Research" shows that left handed DNA is controlled by the signal transduction proteins fos and jun, and that proteases can be synthesized from left handed DNA. As shown in the figure to the right, which was taken from their Methods section, they also provide methods for working with left handed DNA.
    as of 1999 March 3
    This image is posted with permission.
  13. The cover of Bioinformatics has a left handed spiral made out of 1s and 0s. I initially didn't include it in this collection because it has no ladder of bases in the middle so it could be anything, not necessarily DNA. However, the editor Gary Stormo says that it was intended to be "digital DNA" and that they are planning to fix it. (Thanks to Gary Stormo, Stormo@colorado.edu, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 March 16
  14. The home page of the NIH National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) GENETICS RESEARCH BRANCH has a left handed DNA, reflecting the increasing need to help people with mental problems who have left handed DNA. Why, they are right in my own "back yard" since I'm at NIH! (Thanks to Ron Edgar, ron@imagic.weizmann.ac.il, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 March 22
  15. The home page of the NIH National Human Genome Research Institute has both left and handed DNA, to indicate that the effort to sequence the human genome has been changed to sequence both the left and right handed genomes. This is another NIH site!
    as of 1999 March 22

  16. The NIH National Institute on Aging appears to have a new focus, to study whether people tend to age more rapidly due to left handed DNA. Recent Press Releases are on Mild Cognitive and Memory Impairment (3/15/99) and Delirium (3/3/99). This is the third NIH site in a row! Why am I getting dizzy?
    as of 1999 March 24

  17. Invitrogen has some unwound DNA on its 1999 Product Catalog cover that winds up to left handed DNA. What a mesmerizing pretty cover ...
    as of 1999 March 25
  18. The QIAGEN web site product guide page has at least four separate left handed DNAs!





    Each of these points to a page with a left handed banner such as:
    I'm glad to see a company devoted to supporting the DNA isolation needs of molecular biologists studying Left Handed DNA ... *GAK* what am I saying?? Have the CT people infected my mind? Oh, no!! (Thanks to Nico Gey van Pittius, ngvp@gerga.sun.ac.za, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 March 25
    QIAGEN has acknowledged the error and offered to supply the previous images! Thanks!
  19. Thanks to Ron Edgar, ron@imagic.weizmann.ac.il, for pointing out a web site that refuses to be identified.
    as of 1999 March 25
  20. As shown in Roche Molecular Biochemicals' Apoptitoc Pathway Chart, left handed DNA is also degraded by this process. It has been suggested that this is related to the process by which right handed DNA humans are being converted to left DNA handed humans. However, the stronger hypothesis is that the left handed DNA humans are not from earth, as indicated by a report from 10 years ago (Thanks to Nikolaj Vibede, nikolaj.vibede@farmakol.ku.dk, University of Copenhagen, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 March 26
  21. The home page of the NIH National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism According to the person who found this case, it "is rather poor in resolution but it attempts to show a male and female under heavy abuse of alcohol which causes them to see a left handed DNA." (My anonymous source asks: "Am I becoming sufficiently cynical?" No, but you are getting there!)
    as of 1999 March 27
  22. My underground guerrilla-warfare anonymous source also tells me that "The Kesseli Lab at University of Massachusetts at Boston http://fisher.bio.umb.edu/ has three left DNAs at one page... two are happily rotating to the right (is that the biological function of left D.N.A (aka A.N.D) ?) They also explain how to sequence left handed DNA in the scheme (at the middle right on the page) what are they teaching these kids?" Note how there are three phosphates in a vertical column with no distinction between the major and minor grooves ... is this triplex left handed DNA? If so, it would be the first reported case!
    as of 1999 March 27. 2000 December 31: I was alerted by Jennifer Forman that the left handed DNAs have been removed from the lab pages!
  23. The magazine Portable Design reports on page 12 of their February 1999 issue that "Lab-on-a-chip analyzes DNA", and show a diagram of a Labrador retriever happily sailing on a potato chip, with a left handed DNA leash.
    as of 1999 March 27
  24. A QIAGEN advertisement in Nature (28 January 1999, p. xviii) indicates that left handed DNA has now been isolated from tomato, tobacco, maize, potato, wheat, barley, poplar, petunia, geranium, spinach, arabidopsis, elm, pine, rhododendron and oak plants. Apparently plants are being converted also.
    as of 1999 March 30
  25. A PharMingen International advertisement in BioTechniques (Vol.25, No 2 August 1998) was brought to my attention, but it is essentially the same as the one in 1996. However it led us to their web site where a beautiful left handed DNA being bound by an antibody graces the cover of their new 1999 Research Products Catalogue. Such detection schemes will allow more rapid distinction between left and right DNA people for tax purposes. However this new use of genetic technology has ethical dimensions that are being hotly contested.
    as of 1999 April 1

  26. Clinmark dotcom's link page points to a number of companies that do clinical research on left handed DNA people. Their home page also has a tiny left hand DNA link. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 April 6

  27. The Northwestern University Center for Biotechnology is trying to bridge the gap between the science of Left handed DNA and its commercialization. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 April 8

  28. The Agricultural Genome Information System has "an integrated system for agricultural genome analysis" of left handed DNA species. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 April 8

  29. The George Mason University Institute for Biosciences, Bioinformatics and Biotechnology has a left handed DNA on their home page. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing yet another one out!)
    as of 1999 April 11

  30. The cover of the journal European BioPharmaceutical Review for September 1998 and for 1999 This image is posted with permission. has a pretty left handed DNA running across it to indicate that this industry is now using left handed DNA in new pharmaceuticals. (The original is more clear than this gif.) (Thanks to Nikolaj Vibede, nikolaj.vibede@farmakol.ku.dk, University of Copenhagen, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 April 15. They acknowledged and will probably be correcting the cover
  31. The New York Times Science section page D10, Tuesday April 20, 1999 (National Edition) reports that Snips will be used to identify left handed DNA people. (Thanks to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 April 22
  32. Operon Technologies Incorporated advertisement in Science (16 April 1999, no 5413, p. 543) indicates that they will synthesize either left handed or right handed DNA for you.
    as of 1999 April 22
  33. MWGAG BIOTECH sent out a flyer with a left handed DNA (blue and green), and has another on their home page.
    as of 1999 April 26.
    The same images appear in an advertisement in Biotechiques vol 27, No.1 July 1999 pages 44, 45 and 51. (Thanks to Ilya Lyakhov, lyakhovi@ncifcrf.gov, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 July 21
  34. An advertisement by JBL Scientific found at the web magazine HMS Beagle shows the very fast injection of DNA into a cell. If you watch carefully you will see that it is left handed. (This is most easily done by opening just the image and then reloading repeatedly.) JBL was "unable to attain a release from the graphics author" so I can't show you the image.
    as of 1999 May 10

  35. A book "Applied Molecular Genetics" by Roger L. Miesfeld (John Wiley & Sons, 1999), has on its cover the same left handed DNA that appeared on the January 1999 cover of Spectroscopy (Thanks to Denise Rubens rubens@ncifcrf.gov for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 May 11

    This image is posted with permission.
  36. An icon by Andrzej Krause found at the web magazine HMS Beagle shows a set of people riding a left handed "DNA train" according to the editor Lois Wingerson (lois@hmsbeagle.com) who says that "I'll have to look up your rogue's gallery to make sure we _always_ get it right from now on. :^)". (It's not on their main page but is still in their image archive. as of 1999 May 22

  37. In Figure 1 of an article in Science (Science 284: 757 30 April 1999) we learn that reverse endrocrinology is now being done on Left handed DNA containing people. The so-called "orphan nuclear receptors" are genes that look like the receptor for a hormone, but no hormone has been identified yet. Perhaps the problem is that the hormones are enantiomers (reverse handed)? (Thanks to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 May 23


    Congratulations to everybody who helped find the 37 left handed DNAs this year. These makes 1999 beat 1998 and 1997 by a long shot! (What a strange horse race this is! ;-)
  38. The background of a web site gives this lovely plastic looking left handed DNA. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 May 23

  39. TaKaRa advertisement in Science (7 May 1999, no 284, p. 907). According to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com who found one:
    "TaKaRa offers an extensive and proven line of Molecular Biology Products" "Today's Research for Tomorrow's Revolution".
    A full page ad with the upper half page occupied by colored displays of left-handed DNA. (Even more: The four bases are represented, presumably, by the colors green, red, yellow, and blue. Green is shown bonding with red; but red is also shown bonding with yellow; and yellow is also shown bonding with blue; and blue is also shown bonding with green. Looks like a revolution indeed!)."
    as of 1999 May 23
  40. Dako advertisement in Science (7 May 1999, no 284, p. 1043). According to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com who found one: "Half-page ad with purple left_handed DNA in upper-left corner." as of 1999 May 23
  41. The Coulter-Immunotech Cell Analysis Catalogue 1998 cover shows a left handed DNA twisting through cells, plates, tubes and a mouse; presumably all of which also contain left handed DNA. (My browser could not locate their web site, www.immunotech.com.) (Thanks to Steve Mitchell, smitchell@urogenesys.com, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 May 23
  42. A Sigma notification that "Sigma-Aldrich acquires Genosys" shows a left handed DNA against a grid. However the Genosys web site has a nice - rather cool! - right handed DNA being drawn on a grid. as of 1999 May 23
    This image is posted with permission.
  43. The EG&G Wallac home page has a nice left handed DNA next to a baby and instruments. They provide clinical diagnostics for left handed DNA people. as of 1999 May 25

  44. A flyer from ISC BioExpress advertises on page 26 the new OMNIPREP from GeneMate which will generate pure left handed genomic DNA by "[an] amazingly simple protocol". Apparently the method will work with left handed DNA from cells, whole blood, bacteria, tissue, yeast and other materials. (Thanks to Ilya Lyakhov, lyakhovi@ncifcrf.gov, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 May 25
  45. A flyer from Sigma for ready-to-use inhibitor cocktails shows a left handed DNA emerging from a cell. This is the same image as their catalogue cover but made grey-blue and flipped over. as of 1999 May 27
    This image is posted with permission.
  46. The Nolan Lab at the Stanford University Medical center works on helper-free left handed DNA retrovirus producer lines. This follows the discovery of left handed reverse transcriptase, which can transcribe left handed RNA in to left handed DNA.
    Garry Nolan reports that "By the way that is not left-handed DNA in our picture. It is ladder with colored bars that I took a picture of in a mirror and then used adobe photoshop to invert and paint it so it would look cool as a graphic to FOOL people into thinking we were actually working on left-handed DNA. You fell into our trap."
    ***OH NO!!!*** 8-}
    He also reports that "if it WERE a picture of left handed DNA it is the kind of DNA that inhabitants of Arcturus use in their asteroid belt "gqlkj'4g" farming projects." (Thanks to Steve Mitchell, smitchell@urogenesys.com, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 May 28
  47. Iain D. Russell, Adam S. Grancell, and Peter K. Sorger, J. Cell Biol., Volume 145, Number 5, June 1, 933-950, (1999) "The Unstable F-box Protein p58-Ctf13 Forms the Structural Core of the CBF3 Kinetochore Complex", figure 10C, reports that the centromere binding complex in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) is left handed. This case was acknowledged by Peter Sorger and a corrected figure will be printed. (Thanks to W. Steven Ward, sward@UMDNJ.EDU, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 June 2

    Reproduced from The Journal of Cell Biology, 1999, 145, 933-950 by copyright permission of the Rockefeller University Press
  48. The Fisher Scientific BioReagents 1999/2000 catalogue cover. The image was provided by David W. Deerfield II, Manager of the biomedical Applications Department at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, Pittsburgh, PA. He has a nice web page showing many pretty right handed B-form DNAs, including the original. (Thanks to Steve Mitchell, smitchell@urogenesys.com, for confirming that this one really is left handed!) as of 1999 June 10
  49. The January 18, 1999 issue of The New Yorker, page 41, shows a man with a flag scarf around his neck (probably Kari Stefansson, president and CEO of deCode Genetics in Reykjavik, Iceland) holding a left handed DNA ladder (illustrated by D. Levine). (Thanks to David Lloyd-Jones, icomm5@netcom.ca, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 June 10
  50. In the Business Week special edition, "100 Years of Innovation", Summer 1999. page 98. is a section on GENETIC ENGINEERING showing a beautifully curved left handed DNA. (Source: CORBIS/DIGITAL ART) (Thanks to Andy Zander, azander@transgenomic.com, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 June 10

    This image is posted with permission.
  51. The background of the Beckman web site has a subtle but pretty left handed DNA. (Thanks to Chris Wilkes, wilkes@mail.resgen.com, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 June 17

  52. 5 of 6 DNAs on an Apoptosis Signals poster from PharMingen are are left handed. They are down in the orange nucleus, but not visible on this small image. The same images were reported in 1997. (Thanks to Steve Chappell Mitchell, smitchell@urogenesys.com, for pointing this one out!) as of 1999 July 1
  53. The front cover of the Summer 1999 Life Science Edition catalogue from Daigger announces "DNA Daigger's New Attractions". Jack Tessman points out that
    "There is a DNA helix in the upper, outer corner of every one of the catalog's 28 pages. Except for the cover (page 1) which shows [two] right- handed DNAs, all the odd pages show left-handed DNA. The even pages show right-handed DNA. In addition, sprinkled throughout are little men in lab coats that partially cover skeletal [DNA] structures which are right- handed wherever the little man is holding a pointer in his left hand, and left-handed wherever the little man is holding a pointer in his right hand."
    I note also that the button on the man's lab coat switches sides depending on which hand holds the pointer. If I recall correctly, men's clothing (and the lab coats we have in the lab here) have the button on the right side when unclosed. This corresponds to the right handed DNA pictures. So we might infer that the original artist drew the image the "right" way, and it was flipped for publication. (Thanks to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 July 24
    This image is posted with permission.
  54. Seqwright provides the fastest left handed DNA sequencing in the industry, with guaranteed results. (There are two images on the site, permission was granted for posting only one.) (Thanks to Steve Mitchell, smitchell@urogenesys.com, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 August 12

  55. Jack Tessman, points out that in
    Science, August 6, 1999 [volume 285], p. 954, advertising membership in AAAS and subscription to Science, "Relied upon by 159,536 subscribers worldwide", shows one "spiral" (of what is presumably DNA) crossing UNDER the second "spiral" and then crossing back - again UNDER the second "spiral". But the representation improves as the little man scales to new heights.
    (Thanks to Jack Tessman, Emeritus Professor of Physics, Tufts University, Medford MA 02155, jack@silcon.com for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 August 16

  56. In Science, August 20, 1999 [volume 285], p. 1179, advertising subscribing or renewing to Science, a left handed helix crosses the back of a human. It is part of the October 23 1998 cover.
    as of 1999 August 24

    permission requested for image.
  57. A book, "DNA Markers: Protocols, Applications, and Overviews" edited by Gustavo Caetano-Anolles and Peter M. Gresshoff (John Wiley & Sons; ISBN: 0471160679) tells how to work with left handed DNAs. (Thanks to Professor Dr. W. Hennig, Inst. f. Physiolog. Chemie, J. Gutenberg-Universitat, D-55099 Mainz, Germany, whennig@mail.uni-mainz.de, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 August 24

  58. A book, "Blue Genes", a handbook for school experiments (Fonds der Chemischen Industrie, Postfach 111943, 60054 Frankfurt/Main, Fax: 069/25561620), shows on page 21 a left handed "DNA-Struktur" containing Adenin, Thymin, Guanin and Cytosin. (Thanks to Professor Dr. W. Hennig, Inst. f. Physiolog. Chemie, J. Gutenberg-Universitat, D-55099 Mainz, Germany, whennig@mail.uni-mainz.de, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 August 24

    This image is posted with permission.
  59. The cover of the RiboQuant [tm] Multi-Probe RNAse Protection Assay Systems Mailer from PharMingen shows an RNase that can digest left or (!) right handed RNA. (Thanks to Professor Dr. W. Hennig, Inst. f. Physiolog. Chemie, J. Gutenberg-Universitat, D-55099 Mainz, Germany, whennig@mail.uni-mainz.de, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 August 25

    permission requested for image.
  60. Advertisement by U.S. News & World Report September 6, 1999 page 4, "dreams are made real.", shows that by the work of Agilent Technologies, a subsidiary of HP, a left handed DNA is now apparently a reality.
    as of 1999 September 1

    This image is posted with permission.
  61. A meeting next month in Montreal on biotechnology, "Plaque de la Tournante Biotechnologie 99" will apparently be about the uses of left handed DNA in biotechnology. (Thanks to Professor Dr. W. Hennig, Inst. f. Physiolog. Chemie, J. Gutenberg-Universitat, D-55099 Mainz, Germany, whennig@mail.uni-mainz.de, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 September 8

  62. Invitrogen '99 Catalog Update, August 1999, shows a left handed DNA. (Thanks to Professor Dr. W. Hennig, Inst. f. Physiolog. Chemie, J. Gutenberg-Universitat, D-55099 Mainz, Germany, whennig@mail.uni-mainz.de, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 September 8

  63. "To Boldly Grow ..." Scientific American 281: 48B-49 (September 1999). Page 48B shows a method of using a chimeric DNA/RNA molecule to repair a left handed mutated gene.
    as of 1999 September 22

    permission requested for image.
  64. An advertisement by the Genetics Institute in the July 1999 issue of Blood (Journal of the American Society of Hematology, July 15, 1999: 94(2): back cover) has a beautiful left handed DNA ending in a blue drip. There is also a left handed DNA road on their home page. (Thanks to Jim Haupt, jhaupt@Abelson-Taylor.com, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 September 22

  65. The cover of Genes & Development has a left handed DNA running behind the word "Genes". The example here is from their web site. (Thanks to Ronald Chalmers, chalmers@molbiol.ox.ac.uk, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 September 22
    permission requested for image.

    This image is posted with permission.
  66. In Science, September 24, 1999 [volume 285], p. 2091, an advertisement by Chemicon International shows a left handed DNA
    as of 1999 September 29.

  67. In Science, October 15, 1999 [volume 286], p. 558, an advertisement by DNX shows a left handed DNA
    as of 1999 October 21.

    permission requested for image.
  68. At the University of Chicago Division of the Biological Sciences and the Pritzker School of Medicine, are a series of images including a left handed DNA. (Thanks to W. Steven Ward, sward@UMDNJ.EDU, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 October 22.

  69. QSI is advertising WinLIMS, a graphical laboratory manager capable of handling left handed DNA graphics in various journals such as Scientific Computing & Instrumentation, October 1999 page 29.
    as of 1999 October 29.

  70. The National Library of Medicine Technical Bulletin shows a left handed DNA next to a "muscular" person (?) raising their left hand.
    as of 1999 November 7.
    This image is posted with permission.
    permission requested for image.
  71. Gilson apparently now has pipettes designed specifically for left handed DNA amplification by PCR and forensic science ... (Thanks to Dean Madden, dean@madden.tele2.co.uk, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 November 17.

  72. In the first 200 pages of GENES VI (Benjamin Lewin, Oxford Press, 1997), diagrams of left-handed DNA are found in the following figures. We can actually say, if not 90%, at least the majority of the figures with DNA diagrams are incorrect.
    Figs. 3.14; 4.16; 4.20; 4.21; 4.23; 5.2; 5.3; 5.4 (an interesting hairpin structure); 6.1; 6.7; 6.14; 6.17; 6.18; 6.19; 6.20; 6.21 (one DNA has both left-handed and right-handed); 6.24 (similar to that of 6.21); 6.25; 7.2 (similar to 6.21); 7.11; 7.12; and 7.14. (Thanks to Shu Ouyang, ouyangs@ncifcrf.gov, for pointing all of these out!)
    as of 1999 November 24.

  73. Nov. 30: According to MSNBC news, "Scientists make history with genetic discovery". They have now sequenced much of Chromosome 22 from left handed DNA people. This is shown with way cool graphics. (Thanks to David Lloyd-Jones, icomm5@netcom.ca, for pointing this one out!)
    as of 1999 December 1.

    permission requested for image. permission requested for image.
  74. The new Spring 2000 FAES (Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences) Graduate School at NIH Catalog Supplement of Graduate and Undergraduate Courses and the older 1999-2000 Course Catalog both have a large left hand DNA running across both covers.
    as of 1999 December 15.

  75. The New York Times, Tuesday December 21, 1999, p. C1, the article "Biology Meets High Technology" is illustrated with two different images of left handed DNA coming from a patient's cheek cells. Thanks to Jack Tessman, jack@silcon.com for pointing this one.
    as of 1999 December 30.

    This image is posted with permission.
  76. DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) banner has left handed twisted strands. (Thanks to Gorilla Guerilla for pointing this one since "I noticed that 1999 has exactly double the amount of LH DNAs as 1998, so to get it above double here is another site".)
    as of 1999 December 30.

    This image is posted with permission.
  77. PhotoGenetics has a genetic algorithm, based on left handed DNA, for enhancing photographs.
    as of 1999 December 30.


For your first visit to the Left Handed Hall of Fame page I suggest that you follow the story over all of the years. After that you can look at each year individually from the table below. Note: just because a year has gone by does not mean we haven't found more examples for that year!

1997 and 1998 were bumper crop years
and 1999 beat them more than 2 fold. 2000 was a record year, thanks to help from friends around the world (60 of the 97 cases, 63%!). 2001 exceeded even that record! 2002 was lower - are we making headway?


Year Number of Left Handed DNAs
1964 1
... -
~1980 2
1978 1
1982 1
1983 2
... -
1989 3
1990 16 (5 from the Tessman letter)
1991 6
1992 5
1993 6
1994 4
1995 9
1996 31
1997 37
1998 37
1999 77
2000 97
2001 105
2002 57
2003 55
2004 55
2005 44 (minimizing images)
2006 17 (minimizing images)
2007 26 (no images, sorry)
2008 16 (no images, sorry)
2009 23 (no images, sorry)
2010 26 (no images, sorry)
2011 11 (only 2 images, sorry)
2012 11 (only rare images, sorry)
2013 12 (only rare images, sorry)
2014 12 (only rare images, sorry)
2015 3 (images under Fair Use copyright policy)
2016 2 (images under Fair Use copyright policy)
2017 4 (images under Fair Use copyright policy)
All 814


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blue snow drift curve
Tom Schneider
.

updated: 2017Nov05_15:18:59

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